November 30, 2020

New: Use Wolfram|Alpha to Analyze Shakespeare and Other Great Works of Literature

Here’s yet another example for your growing list of things  you can do with Wolfram|Alpha, the superb and always expanding reference and ready reference tool.

From a Wolfram|Alpha Blog Post:

For hundreds of years, scholars have carefully studied the plays of Shakespeare, breaking down the language and carefully dissecting every act and scene. We thought it would be interesting to see what sorts of computational insights Wolfram|Alpha could provide, so we uploaded the complete catalog of Shakespeare’s plays into our database. This allows our users to examine Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Othello, and the rest of the Bard’s plays in an entirely new way.

Entering a play into Wolfram|Alpha, like A Midsummer Night’s Dream, brings up basic information, such as number of acts, scenes, and characters. It also provides more in-depth info like longest word, most frequent words, number of words and sentences, and more. It’s also easy to find more specific information about a particular act or scene with queries like “What is the longest word in King Lear?”, “What is the average sentence length of Macbeth?”, and “How many unique words are there in Twelfth Night?

The post also mentions that you can also use Wolfram|Alpha for computional analysis of other great works of literature including Moby Dick, Great Expectations, and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Read the Complete Post for More Examples

A Couple of Screenshots

Search: Longest Word in Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet

Search: Moby Dick

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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