September 25, 2021

New Journal Article: “Revisiting the Digital Humanities Through the Lens of Indigenous Studies—or How to Question the Cultural Blindness of Our Technologies and Practices”

The article linked below (full text) was recently published by The Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST).

Title

Revisiting the Digital Humanities Through the Lens of Indigenous Studies—or How to Question the Cultural Blindness of Our Technologies and Practices

Author

Coppélie Cocq
Humlab, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Department of Cultures, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Source

The Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST)
First Published August 13, 20201
DOI: 10.1002/asi.24564

Abstract

This article examines the benefits of putting Indigenous perspectives and the digital humanities (DH) in conversation with each other in order to elaborate a DH approach that is suitable for Indigenous research and to suggest critical perspectives for a more sustainable DH. For this purpose, the article examines practices of data harvesting, categorizing, and sharing from the perspectives of groups in the margin, more specifically in relation to Sámi research. Previous research has emphasized the role of cultural and social contexts in the design, use, and adaptation of technologies in general, and digital technologies in particular (Douglas, 1987. Inventing American broadcasting; Nissenbaum, 2001. Computer, 34, 118–120; Powell & Aitken, 2011. The American literature scholar in the digital age) and several scholars have argued for how the application of critical studies make a fruitful contribution to the DH (Liu, 2012. Debates in the digital humanities; McPherson, 2012. Debates in the digital humanities). This article suggests an approach that addresses a need to acknowledge the diversity of technoscientific traditions. The perspectives of Indigenous groups bring this matter to a head. In order to make the DH more sustainable and inclusive, the development of the DH should be driven by cultural studies to a greater extent than it has been so far. A sustainable DH also means a better rendering of the plurality of the cultural values, perspectives, and ethics that characterize our fieldwork and research subjects.

Direct to Full Text Article

Direct to Full Text Article
12 pages; PDF.

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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