September 23, 2020

Journal Article: “Analyzing Academic Mobility of U.S. Professors Based on the ORCID Data and the Carnegie Classification”

The following article was recently accepted for publication by Quantitative Science Studies published by MIT Press.

Title

Analyzing Academic Mobility of U.S. Professors Based on the ORCID Data and the Carnegie Classification

Authors

Erjia Yan
Drexel University

Yongjun Zhu
Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea

Jiangen He
University of Tennessee

Source

Quantitative Science Studies
DOI: 10.1162/qss_a_00088

Abstract

This paper uses two open science data sources—ORCID and Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (CCIHE)—to identify tenure-track and tenured professors in the U.S. who have changed academic affiliations. Through a series of data cleaning and processing, 5,938 professors met the selection criteria of professorship and mobility. Using ORCID professor profiles and the Carnegie Classification, this paper reveals patterns of academic mobility in the U.S. from the aspects of institution types, locations, regions, funding mechanisms of institutions, and professors’ genders. This paper finds that professors tended to move to institutions with higher research intensity such as those with a R1 or R2 designation in the Carnegie Classification. They also tend to move from rural institutions to urban institutions. Additionally, this paper finds that female professors are more likely to move within the same geographic region than male professors and that when they move from a less research-intensive institution to a more research-intensive one, female professors are less likely to retain their rank or attain promotion.

Direct to Full Text Article
22 pages; PDF.

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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