February 22, 2020

Report From Japan: “Paper Book Readers Better at Various Abilities Than E-Book Readers”

From The Japan News/The Yomiuri Shimbun:

People who habitually read paper books tend to have a higher degree of willingness to work on anything and to think more multilaterally than those who prefer to read electronic books on a smartphone or a computer, according to a recent survey by the National Institution For Youth Education, which was released Monday.

The survey on reading habits was conducted on 5,000 people in their 20s to 60s in February. For the first time in a survey of this kind, the respondents were divided into five groups depending on their reading habits, such as which medium they mainly use and how many hours they read. The groups are: 1) paper book readers; 2) those who read on a smartphone or a tablet computer; 3) those who read on a PC; 4) those who read on two or more electronic devices; and 5) those who hardly ever read books.

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Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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