April 17, 2021

New Data: Facebook, Instagram Pulled Millions of Posts for Violation

From Bloomberg:

Facebook Inc. removed tens of millions of user posts in the past six months for violating its terms of service regarding issues like child pornography, drug sales and terrorism. Millions more were removed from Instagram.

That’s according to a report released Wednesday by Facebook that details how the social media company enforces its own content policies. The report, which is published every six months and for the first time includes data from Instagram, said that Facebook identifies most of the content it removes automatically using its own software algorithms.

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Some highlights from the report:

  • Facebook removed 11.6 million pieces of content related to child pornography in the quarter ended in September. Facebook says its algorithms identified 99% of that content. Instagram removed another 754,000 pieces of content, with an automatic detection rate of just under 95%. By comparison, in the first quarter, Facebook removed just 5.8 million pieces of content related to child porn or exploitation.
  • Facebook removed 4.4 million pieces of content related to drug sales in the third quarter, and another 2.3 million related to firearm sales. That was up from 841,000 and 609,000 pieces respectively six months earlier.

Read the Complete Article

See Also: Report Summary (via Facebook Newsroom)

See Also: Facebook Includes Instagram in its Transparency Report for the First Time: But Information on Fake Accounts and Hate Speech is Missing (via The Verge)

Direct to Report Cited in Article (Facebook Community Standards Enforcement Report)

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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