August 22, 2019

Journal Article: “Crowding the Library: How and Why Libraries are Using Crowdsourcing to Engage the Public”

A new “Innovations in Practice” article published by Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research.

Title

Crowding the Library: How and Why Libraries are Using Crowdsourcing to Engage the Public

Authors

Sarah Severson

Jean-Sébastien Sauve

Source

Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research
Vol 14 No 1 (2019): Early Release
DOI: 10.21083/partnership.v14i1.4632

Abstract

Over the past 10 years, there has been a noticeable increase of crowdsourcing projects in cultural heritage institutions, where digital technologies are being used to open up their collections and encourage the public to engage with them in a very direct way. Libraries, archives and museums have long had a history and mandate of outreach and public engagement but crowdsourcing marks a move towards a more participatory and inclusive model of engagement. If a library wants to start a crowdsourcing project, what do they need to know?

This article is written from a Canadian University library perspective with the goal to help the reader engage with the current crowdsourcing landscape. This article’s contribution includes a literature review and a survey of popular projects and platforms; followed by a case study of a crowdsourcing pilot completed at the McGill Library. The article pulls these two threads of theory and practice together—with a discussion of some of the best practices learned through the literature and real-life experience, giving the reader practical tools to help a library evaluate if crowdsourcing is right for them, and how to get a desired project off the ground.

Direct to Full Text Article
18 pages; PDF.

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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