August 17, 2019

New Report: Number of Women with U.S. Doctorates in Science, Engineering, or Health Employed in the United States More Than Doubles since 1997

From the National Science Foundation:

In 2017, an estimated 1,103,200 individuals worldwide held a research doctoral degree in a science, engineering, or health (SEH) field that was earned at a U.S. academic institution, an increase of over 55,000 doctorate recipients since 2015. A total of 967,500 (88%) were residing in the United States, and over one-third of them were women (338,400). An additional 135,700 were living abroad, one-fourth (33,700) of whom were women  Among those doctorate recipients living outside the United States in 2017, a majority (54%) lived in Asia and nearly 20% lived in Europe (including Russia).

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As the number and share of women with U.S.-earned SEH doctorate degrees residing and working in the United States increased over the years, the proportion of women involved in research and development (R&D) as their primary work activity also increased significantly. Persons engaged in R&D activities are employed U.S.-trained SEH doctorate holders who report basic research, applied research, development, or design their primary work activity—that is, more of their hours are spent on an R&D activity during a typical week than on any other work activity. Overall, in 2017, 30% of U.S.-trained SEH doctorate holders performing an R&D activity as their primary work activity were women; in 1997, the proportion was 19% .

Direct to Complete Report ||| PDF Version (7 pages)

Also Released Today…

Survey of Doctorate Recipients Survey Year 2017 ||| Direct to XLS Files (.zip)

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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