September 28, 2021

New Research Article: “Scientific Impact Increases When Researchers Publish In Open Access And International Collaboration: A Bibliometric Analysis on Poverty-Related Disease Papers”

The following article was published by PLoS One earlier today.

Title

Scientific Impact Increases When Researchers Publish In Open Access And International Collaboration: A Bibliometric Analysis on Poverty-Related Disease Papers

Authors

J. Gabrielle Breugelmans
European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP), The Hague, Netherlands

Guillaume Roberge
Science-Metrix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada<

Chantale Tippett
Science-Metrix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Matt Durning
Science-Metrix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

David Brooke Struck
Science-Metrix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Michael M. Makanga
European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP), The Hague, Netherlands

Source

PLoS ONE 13(9): e0203156
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0203156

Abstract

The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP), like many other research funders, requires its grantees to make papers available via open access (OA). This article investigates the effect of publishing in OA journals and international collaboration within and between European and sub-Saharan African countries on citation impact and likelihood of falling into the top 1% and top 10% most cited papers in poverty-related disease (PRD) research.

Methods

Disease-specific research publications were identified in the Web of Science™ and MEDLINE using Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms. Data on the open accessibility of scientific literature were derived from 1science oaFindr. Publication data, including relative citation counts, were extracted for 2003–2015. Regression models were applied to quantify the relationship between relative citations and presence in the 1% and top 10% most cited papers versus OA and international collaboration.

Results

The results show that since 2003 papers on PRDs have become increasingly available in OA. Among all PRD areas, malaria research is most frequently published in OA and in international collaboration. The adjusted regression analyses show that holding other factors constant, publishing research in OA and in international collaboration has a significant and meaningful citation advantage over non-OA or non-international collaborative research. Publishing papers as part of a European-wide or European- sub-Saharan African collaboration increases research impact. In contrast, such collaboration advantage is not observed for research output involving sub-Saharan Africa only which seems to decrease research impact.

Conclusions

Our results indicate that there is a real, measurable citation advantage for publishing PRD research in OA and international collaboration. However, the international collaboration advantage seems to be region-specific with increased research impact for European-wide and European-sub-Saharan African collaborations but a decrease in research impact of collaborations confined to sub-Saharan African research institutions. Further research is required to further verify this finding and to understand the underlying factors related to this observed decrease in research impact. To target future research capacity building activities in sub-Saharan Africa it is important to assess whether the observed decreased impact reflects the scientific competencies and geographic distribution of individual researchers or institutional-, national- or funder-specific research requirements.

Direct to Full Text Article

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

Share