May 15, 2021

Research Article: “Can Microsoft Academic Help to Assess the Citation Impact of Academic Books?” (Preprint)

The following research article (preprint) was recently shared on arXiv.

Title

Can Microsoft Academic Help to Assess the Citation Impact of Academic Books?

Authors

Kayvan Kousha
University of Wolverhampton

Mike Thelwall
University of Wolverhampton

Source

via arXiv
In Press (2018): Journal of Informatics

Abstract

Despite recent evidence that Microsoft Academic is an extensive source of citation counts for journal articles, it is not known if the same is true for academic books. This paper fills this gap by comparing citations to 16,463 books from 2013-2016 in the Book Citation Index (BKCI) against automatically extracted citations from Microsoft Academic and Google Books in 17 fields. About 60% of the BKCI books had records in Microsoft Academic, varying by year and field. Citation counts from Microsoft Academic were 1.5 to 3.6 times higher than from BKCI in nine subject areas across all years for books indexed by both. Microsoft Academic found more citations than BKCI because it indexes more scholarly publications and combines citations to different editions and chapters. In contrast, BKCI only found more citations than Microsoft Academic for books in three fields from 2013-2014. Microsoft Academic also found more citations than Google Books in six fields for all years. Thus, Microsoft Academic may be a useful source for the impact assessment of books when comprehensive coverage is not essential.

Direct to Full Text Article (Preprint)
16 pages; PDF.

See Also: Microsoft Academic Graph Now Contains Over 176 Million Articles, Announces Improved Patent Coverage

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

Share