December 9, 2018

Harvard and MIT Project: “Private Browsing Gets More Private”

From MIT:

This week, at the Network and Distributed Systems Security Symposium, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Harvard University presented a paper describing a new system, dubbed Veil, that makes private browsing more private.

Veil would provide added protections to people using shared computers in offices, hotel business centers, or university computing centers, and it can be used in conjunction with existing private-browsing systems and with anonymity networks such as Tor, which was designed to protect the identity of web users living under repressive regimes.

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With existing private-browsing sessions, [Frank] Wang [an MIT graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science and first author on the paper] explains, a browser will retrieve data much as it always does and load it into memory. When the session is over, it attempts to erase whatever it retrieved.

But in today’s computers, memory management is a complex process, with data continuously moving around between different cores (processing units) and caches (local, high-speed memory banks). When memory banks fill up, the operating system might transfer data to the computer’s hard drive, where it could remain for days, even after it’s no longer being used.

Generally, a browser won’t know where the data it downloaded has ended up. Even if it did, it wouldn’t necessarily have authorization from the operating system to delete it.

Veil gets around this problem by ensuring that any data the browser loads into memory remains encrypted until it’s actually displayed on-screen. Rather than typing a URL into the browser’s address bar, the Veil user goes to the Veil website and enters the URL there. A special server — which the researchers call a blinding server — transmits a version of the requested page that’s been translated into the Veil format.

The Veil page looks like an ordinary webpage: Any browser can load it. But embedded in the page is a bit of code — much like the embedded code that would, say, run a video or display a list of recent headlines in an ordinary page — that executes a decryption algorithm. The data associated with the page is unintelligible until it passes through that algorithm.

Once the data is decrypted, it will need to be loaded in memory for as long as it’s displayed on-screen. That type of temporarily stored data is less likely to be traceable after the browser session is over. But to further confound would-be attackers, Veil includes a few other security features.

Learn More, Read the Complete MIT Article

See Also: Direct to Full Text of Paper Presented at Symposium: “Veil: Private Browsing Semantics Without Browser-side Assistance”
15 pages; PDF.

See Also: Program and Links All Papers Presented at Network and Distributed Systems Security Symposium 2018

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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