February 21, 2018

Yale University: Project Revives Old Software, ‘Preserves Born-Digital’ Data (Emulation as a Service)

From YaleNews:

Digital preservationists at Yale University Library are building a shareable “emulation as a service” infrastructure to resurrect thousands of obsolete software programs and ensure that the information produced on them will be kept intact and made easily available for future access, study, and use.

Funded through a pair of $1 million grants from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the project will enable access to at least 3,000 applications, including operating systems, scientific software, office and email applications, design and engineering software, and software for creative pursuits like video editing or music composition.

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The project is scheduled for completion in June 2020. The library’s preservationists are collaborating on the project with the Software Preservation Network, an association of digital preservationists committed to ensuring long-term access to software. They will also work with OpenSLX, a firm that is widely considered a leading developer of the technology underpinning the shareable infrastructure the library is building.

Read the Complete Announcement

See Also: Mellon Foundation Funding Announcement

See Also: Sloan Foundation Funding Announcement

See Also: Emulation & Virtualization as Preservation Strategies (by David S. H. Rosenthal; 2015)

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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