November 26, 2020

Two New Data-Rich Reports from the National Center for Education Statistics

Both reports were published online on July 18, 2017.

1. NCES Releases New Data on Postsecondary Tuition, Fees and Degrees

Summary

Between 2014-15 and 2016-17, the average tuition and required fees at 4-year public institutions increased more than 4 percent for both in-state and out-of-state students (after adjusting for inflation). During that same time period, tuition and required fees increased about 5 percent at 4-year nonprofit institutions and increased about 1 percent at for-profit institutions.

The National Center for Education Statistics released a new First Look report today (July 18) that presents preliminary data findings from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) fall 2016 collection. This collection included three survey components: Institutional Characteristics for the 2016-17 academic year, Completions covering the period July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016, and data on 12-Month Enrollment for the 2015-16 academic year.

Other findings include:

In 2016-17, there were 6,760 Title IV institutions in the United States and other U.S. jurisdictions—2,918 were classified as 4-year institutions, 1,995 were 2-year institutions, and the remaining 1,847 were less-than-2-year institutions;

Of the roughly 3.3 million students receiving degrees or certificates at 4-year Title IV degree-granting institutions, more than 58 percent received a bachelor’s degree. This percentage varied by control of institution, with about 64 percent of the 1.9 million students at public institutions receiving a bachelor’s degree, roughly 53 percent of the 1.1 million students at nonprofit institutions receiving a bachelor’s degree, and about 42 percent of the 286,000 students at for-profit institutions receiving a bachelor’s degree;

Institutions reported a 12-month unduplicated headcount enrollment of about 27.0 million individual students. Of these, roughly 23.1 million were undergraduates and approximately 3.8 million were graduate students.

Direct to Full Text Report


2. Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2017

Summary

The National Center for Education Statistics released a new report today (July 18) entitled Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups, 2017. This report provides details on the educational progress and challenges students face in the United States by race and ethnicity. The report presents 28 indicators on topics ranging from prekindergarten through postsecondary education, as well as labor force outcomes.

The new report shows that public schools are becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. Between fall 2003 and fall 2013, the percentage of students enrolled in public elementary and secondary schools decreased for students who were White (from 59 to 50 percent) and Black (from 17 to 16 percent). In contrast, the percentage increased for students who were Hispanic (from 19 to 25 percent) and Asian/ Pacific Islander (from 4 to 5 percent) during the same time period.

Other key findings include:

In 2014, the percentage of children under age 18 living in poverty based on the official poverty measure was highest for Black children (37 percent), followed by Hispanic children (31 percent), and White and Asian children (12 percent each);

In 2014, about 4.7 million public school students participated in English language learner (ELL) programs. Hispanic students made up the majority of this group (78 percent), with around 3.6 million participating in ELL programs;

On the NAEP reading assessment, the White-Black gap in scale scores narrowed in Grade 4 from 32 points in 1992 to 26 points in 2015, while the White-Hispanic gap (24 points) was not measurably different from 1992. In grade 8 reading, the White-Hispanic gap narrowed from 26 points in 1992 to 21 points in 2015, while the White-Black gap (26 points) was not measurably different from 1992;

From 1990 to 2015, the high school status completion rate for 18- to 24-year-olds increased from 59 percent to 88 percent for Hispanic students, from 83 percent to 92 percent for Black students; and from 90 percent to 95 percent for White students. Despite this progress, the completion rates for Hispanic and Black 18- to 24-year-olds remained lower than the White rate in 2015;

The number of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students more than doubled between 2003–04 and 2013–14. During the same period, the number of degrees awarded also increased for Black (by 46 percent), Asian/Pacific Islander (by 43 percent), and White (by 19 percent) students; and

In 2014, among those who had not completed high school, higher percentages of Black and American Indian/Alaska Native adults (both 22 percent) were unemployed compared to White (13 percent), Hispanic (8 percent), and Asian (7 percent) adults.

Direct to Full Text Report

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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