September 23, 2020

Google Scholar 2017 Metrics Released

From the Google Scholar Blog:

Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2017 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2012–2016 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2017.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv and NBER. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2012-2016, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

From the Google Scholar Metrics Info Site

To get started, you can browse the top 100 publications in several languages, ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. To see which articles in a publication were cited the most and who cited them, click on its h-index number to view the articles as well as the citations underlying the metrics.

You can also explore publications in research areas of your interest. To browse publications in a broad area of research, select one of the areas in the left column. For example: Engineering & Computer Science or Health & Medical Sciences.

To explore specific research areas, select one of the broad areas, click on the “Subcategories” link and then select one of the options. For example: Databases & Information Systems or Development Economics.

The blog post also points out:

You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages – for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [allergy], [cardiología], [biomarkers].

See Also: Journal Metrics: Scopus Releases 2016 CiteScore Data (May 2017) ||| CiteScore Metrics: Along with New Values Come Improvements (via Scopus Blog)

See Also: Elsevier Introduces “CiteScore” Impact Metrics for 22,000 Academic Journals Indexed in Scopus (December 8, 2016)
Access to Citescore data is available at no charge on open web.

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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