July 22, 2019

Law Library of Congress Launches International Tribunals Web Archive

From the In Custodia Legis Blog/Law Library of Congress:

International tribunals have been around for some time, but the creation of international courts and tribunals to deal with international crimes is a relatively recent occurrence, with the first international criminal tribunal established just after World War II. The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law defines “international courts and tribunals” as ”permanent judicial bodies made up of independent judges which are entrusted with adjudicating international disputes on the basis of international law according to a pre-determined set of rules of procedure and rendering decisions which are binding on the parties.”

In order to organize and manage digital content available on international courts and tribunals, the Library of Congress Web Archiving Team and the Law Library of Congress recently launched an “International Tribunals Archive” (ITA).

The ITA is an archive with the purpose of digitally storing relevant websites hosting information about the most important international tribunals created since World War II for researchers today and in the future.

Read the Complete LLOC Blog Post

See Also: The Library of Congress Launches Two New Collections of Archived Web Content: Webcomics Archive and Web Cultures Archive (June 13, 2017)

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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