February 27, 2021

Two New Digital Collections Available Online From National Library of Medicine

Two new digital collections are now available from NLM.

From the National Library of Medicine (NLM):

Incunabula: A collection of books and broadsides printed in Europe before 1501 includes over forty items from the Library’s world-renowned collection of more than 580 incunabula on subjects relating to science and medicine, from printed classical works of Galen and Hippocrates to materials on the plague and other “pestilences.” Incunabula (from the Latin for “cradle”) are books and other materials produced with movable type on a printing press between the mid-1450s through the end of 1500 — the infancy of the age of printing.  This digital collection will grow over time as the Library scans more incunabula titles.

Highlights of this new collection include:

  • De pollutione nocturna by Jean Gerson (Cologne, 1466), considered the oldest medical book published in the West;
  • a hand-colored copy of Astrolabium planu[m] in tabulis ascendens by Johannes Angelus (Augsburg, 1488), with over 400 woodcut illustrations and 80 miniatures depicting the influence of the 12 signs of the zodiac on everyday life.

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World War 2, 1939-1949: A collection of U.S. government documents includes more than 1,500 federal, state, and local government publications. Among the variety of materials included are government reports, first aid manuals, informational pamphlets, and recruitment materials that demonstrate the efforts of government, military personnel, health professionals, and scientists, among others, on the home front and overseas during and immediately following the Second World War.

Highlights of this new collection include:

  • publications on the challenges introduced by the new weaponry of chemical warfare, including an illustrated field manual entitled  Defense against chemical attack, released by the U.S. Army in 1940;
  • a 1945 self-care guide entitled Keep well! Here’s How published by the War Shipping Administration that warns of the dangers of malaria, dysentery, and venereal disease;
  • recruitment brochures, reports, and other materials that display the changing role and status of the military nurse during and after the war;

Direct to NLM Digital Collections Homepage

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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