November 27, 2020

Wikimedia Foundation, ACLU, and Others Sue National Security Agency (NSA) and Justice Dept. Over Mass Surveillance Program

From the Wikimedia Foundation:

Today, the Wikimedia Foundation is filing suit against the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) of the United States. The lawsuit challenges the NSA’s mass surveillance program, and specifically its large-scale search and seizure of internet communications — frequently referred to as “upstream” surveillance. Our aim in filing this suit is to end this mass surveillance program in order to protect the rights of our users around the world. We are joined by eight other organizations and represented by theAmerican Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

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Our case today challenges the NSA’s use of upstream surveillance conducted under the authority of the 2008 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Amendments Act (FAA). Upstream surveillance taps the internet’s “backbone” to capture communications with “non-U.S. persons.” The FAA authorizes the collection of these communications if they fall into the broad category of “foreign intelligence information” that includes nearly any information that could be construed as relating to national security or foreign affairs. The program casts a vast net, and as a result, captures communications that are not connected to any “target,” or may be entirely domestic. This includes communications by our users and staff.

Read the Complete Announcement 

See Also: NY Times Op Ed by Jimmy Wales and Lila Tretikov: “Stop Spying on Wikipedia Users”

List of Nine Organizations Filing Complaint

Wikimedia Foundation

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

Human Rights Watch Amnesty International USA

Pen American Center

Global Fund For Women

The Nation Magazine

The Rutherford Institute

Washington Office On Latin America

Full Text of Complaint

  Wikimedia v. NSA Complaint

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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