November 25, 2020

New Research From Verizon About Millennial Population, Entertainment, and Digital Media

New research findings released today by Verizon Digital Media (always good to keep source in mind). It’s also worth noting that the report does not include a section about methodology.

Focus of report is on television viewing.

What do millennials want when it comes to online viewing, and what should broadcasters know to improve their chances in this market?

That’s the question Verizon Digital Media Services attempted to answer with a two-part research project about the entertainment habits of the millennial generation.

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The first part of the project, completed in November 2013, consisted of surveying 1,000 consumers — 800 of them aged between 16 and 34 and identified as millennials — and 200 aged 35 to 64. The second part of the research consisted of in-depth, in-home interviews with eight selected millennials.

Among the findings:

  • Millennials are extremely sensitive to quality and performance. They are quicker than older generations to abandon an entertainment source if the quality is poor, slow-loading, or has other technical problems.
  • Millennials are brand loyal, but far less loyal to traditional broadcast networks than non-millennials. In fact, not a single network made the top ten list of brand loyalties for millennials.
  • Millennials are more likely to use multiple screens when enjoying entertainment, but less likely to use second and third screens for purposes directly related to what they’re watching.
  • As an on-demand generation, millennials expect to choose how, what and when they watch.

Read the Complete Report, Millennials and Entertainment (51 pages; PDF)

Source: Verizon Digital Media

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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