March 8, 2021

IMLS Funds UC Riverside Project to Expand Catalog of Latin American Publications Printed Between 1500 and 1851

From UC Riverside:

The Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research (CBSR) at the University of California, Riverside has received a $250,000 grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services to support the center’s Un Catálogo Colectivo de Impresos Latinoamericanos hasta 1851 (CCILA).

CCILA is a union catalog (which describes the collections of many libraries) and bibliography of Latin American publications printed from about 1500 to 1851. It is composed of roughly 50,000 records in Spanish, Portuguese and original native languages, and is freely accessible at http://ccila.ucr.edu.

The two-year grant funds the second phase of the project, which will at least double the size of the database. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums, according to the organization’s website.

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Latin America remains one of the few geographic regions without a comprehensive bibliography for the “hand-press era,” the centuries before machine printing. For England and the English-speaking world, the monumental English Short Title Catalog (ESTC) is a record of every known publication printed in English in the British Isles and North America from the birth of the printing press in 1473 to 1801. Started in 1976 as a cooperative effort between the British Library and the CBSR in North America, the ESTC now contains close to 500,000 records and continues to grow and evolve.

The Heritage of the Printed Book database (HPB) covers items of printing in continental Europe before 1830 and is the primary resource for librarians and researchers interested in the European hand-press period..

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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