October 27, 2021

eBooks: PDA and the University Press, Full Text Report Now Online

Note: We first posted about this report a couple of weeks ago with a link to this EDUCAUSE Review article,  “The New Supply Chain and Its Implications for Books in Libraries”

From a Summary on The Scholarly Kitchen by Joe Esposito (Co-Author of the Report):

Patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) is a method by which libraries acquire books that delays purchase until the moment of first use. The aim of this report is to provide guidance to publishers, especially university presses, as to how to offset any sales losses from PDA and, through a tighter weaving of publishers’ and libraries’ interests, even identify means to augment sales and to improve the service that libraries provide for their constituencies.

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PDA is not likely to be implemented by all libraries in a uniform or comprehensive fashion. For the most part, libraries are including PDA programs as simply one additional way they add titles to their collections. Even as PDA becomes more widespread, it is not likely that it will ever become comprehensive: all libraries may someday have PDA programs in place, but for some libraries PDA budgets will likely remain but a small part of overall spending on books. Thus publishers’ concerns that PDA could rapidly and totally transform the book market overstate the case.

Final Report

Title

PDA an the University Press

Authors

Joseph J. Esposito

in collaboration with:

Kizer Walker
Cornell University Library

Terry Ehling
Project MUSE, The Johns Hopkins University Press

Direct to Full Text (68 pages; PDF)

The report includes a copy of:

+ PDA Workflow For The Cornell University Library (Chart)
Appendix A

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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