June 25, 2016

Nine Congressional Research Service Reports on the U.S. Supreme Court Nomination Process

Steven Aftergood at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) has shared a collection of full text Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports about the U.S. Supreme Court nominations process.

The entire collection of nine reports is available on the Secrecy News blog and we’re also sharing direct links below.

The Federation of American Scientists website is home to a large and frequently updated unofficial collection of publicly accessible CRS reports.

The Congressional Research Service does not officially make their reports available.

USSC Nomination Process CRS Reports

Speed of Presidential and Senate Actions on Supreme Court Nominations, 1900-2010, August 6, 2010

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate, February 19, 2010

Supreme Court Nominations Not Confirmed, 1789-August 2010, August 20, 2010

Supreme Court Nominations: Senate Floor Procedure and Practice, 1789-2011, March 11, 2011

Supreme Court Appointment Process: President’s Selection of a Nominee, October 19, 2015

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Consideration by the Senate Judiciary Committee, October 19, 2015

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Senate Debate and Confirmation Vote, October 19, 2015

Questioning Supreme Court Nominees About Their Views on Legal or Constitutional Issues: A Recurring Issue, June 23, 2010

Supreme Court Justices: Demographic Characteristics, Professional Experience, and Legal Education, 1789-2010, April 9, 2010

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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