October 9, 2015

German Government Puts 700,000 WWI Docs Online

From TheLocal.de:

Hundreds of thousands of rare records and images from World War I have been put online by the German government, ahead of Monday’s 100th anniversary of the start of the conflict.

More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive’s website ||| English language homepage.

The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free.

Read the Complete Article

See Also: Europeana 1914-1918 Portal

Europeana 1914-1918 is the most important pan-European collection of original First World War source material. It is the result of three years of work by 20 European countries and will include:

  •  400,000 rare documents digitised by 10 state libraries and two other partners in Europe
  • 660 hours of unique film material digitised by audiovisual archives
  • 90,000 personal papers and memorabilia of some 7,000 people involved in the war, held by their families and digitised at special events in 12 countries
Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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