October 13, 2015

“Mobile Libraries: Librarians’ and Students’ Perspectives” (Research Article)

Note: What follows is the published version of an article we first shared as a preprint on November 12, 2012. The published version appears in the March 2014 issue (75.2) of College & Research Libraries.


Mobile Libraries: Librarians’ and  Students’ Perspectives


Noa Aharony
Bar-Ilan University, Israel


College & Research Libraries
March 2014 (75.2)


This study which is based on the Technological Acceptance Model (TAM), seeks to explore whether librarians and LIS students are familiar with the newest technological innovations and whether they are ready to accept them. The research was conducted in Israel during the first and second semesters of the 2012 academic year and considered two populations: librarians and LIS students. Researchers used two questionnaires to gather data: a personal details questionnaire, and a mobile technology questionnaire. On the whole, the current study supported the two core variables of the TAM (perceived ease of use and usefulness), as well as personal innovativeness that may predict librarians’ and students’ behavioral intention to use mobile services in the library.

Direct to Full Text (16 pages; PDF)

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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