April 24, 2014

Miniature Books Exhibition Opens at National Library of Scotland

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From the BBC:

Old King Cole, published in 1985 by the Gleniffer Press in Paisley, measures only 0.9mm in height.

It held the world record for the smallest printed book, for 20 years.

It is one of about 85 miniature books from the library’s collections which will be displayed to the public for free until 17 November.

Exhibition curator James Mitchell said: “Many are works of art or miracles of technology and are highly collectable.”

A miniature book is generally defined as one that is less than 7.5cm (3in) in height and width.

Read the Complete Report, View Images of Tiny Books

Additional Info and Images

Direct to Additional Images and Background from National Library of Scotland

Direct to Miniature Books Page from National Library of Scotland

See Also: Miniature books go on display at National Library of Scotland (via The Guardian)

James Mitchell, who has been instrumental in building the NLS’s collection of miniature books, and who curated the new display, said: “Many are works of art or miracles of technology and are highly collectable. Old King Cole is produced using offset lithography, which is a version of the traditional Gutenberg method. They appeal to children because they are more of a scale for them, and for adults it’s about the artistry, design and execution.”

miniature old king cole with coin 500 Miniature Books Exhibition Opens at National Library of Scotland

‘Old King Cole’ (Paisley: Gleniffer Press, 1985) [NLS shelfmark FB.s.307]
Source: National Library of Scotland
share save 171 16 Miniature Books Exhibition Opens at National Library of Scotland
Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.