May 16, 2022

Journal Article: “Examining Linguistic Shifts Between Preprints and Publications” & Preprint Similarity Search Application Now Available

The article linked below was recently published by PLOS Biology.

Title

Examining Linguistic Shifts Between Preprints and Publications

Authors

David N. Nicholson
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Vincent Rubinetti
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
University of Colorado School of Medicine

Dongbo Hu
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Marvin Thielk
Elsevier

Lawrence E. Hunter
University of Colorado School of Medicine

Casey S. Greene
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
University of Colorado School of Medicine

Source

PLOS Biology
20(2): e3001470.

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3001470

Abstract

Preprints allow researchers to make their findings available to the scientific community before they have undergone peer review. Studies on preprints within bioRxiv have been largely focused on article metadata and how often these preprints are downloaded, cited, published, and discussed online. A missing element that has yet to be examined is the language contained within the bioRxiv preprint repository. We sought to compare and contrast linguistic features within bioRxiv preprints to published biomedical text as a whole as this is an excellent opportunity to examine how peer review changes these documents. The most prevalent features that changed appear to be associated with typesetting and mentions of supporting information sections or additional files. In addition to text comparison, we created document embeddings derived from a preprint-trained word2vec model. We found that these embeddings are able to parse out different scientific approaches and concepts, link unannotated preprint–peer-reviewed article pairs, and identify journals that publish linguistically similar papers to a given preprint. We also used these embeddings to examine factors associated with the time elapsed between the posting of a first preprint and the appearance of a peer-reviewed publication. We found that preprints with more versions posted and more textual changes took longer to publish.

Lastly, we constructed a web application that allows users to identify which journals and articles that are most linguistically similar to a bioRxiv or medRxiv preprint as well as observe where the preprint would be positioned within a published article landscape.

Direct to Full Text Article

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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