October 27, 2021

Law Library of Congress and GPO Digitize 287 Volumes of the United States Congressional Serial Set, First Selected Volumes Now Available Online

From the Library of Congress:

The Law Library of Congress, in collaboration with the U.S. Government Publishing Office, has digitized 287 volumes of the United States Congressional Serial Set and made them available on the Library’s website.

The release is part of a decade-long partnership to digitize more than 15,000 volumes of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set — the reports and documents of the House and Senate, including proposed legislation, committee reports and issues under investigation — dating back to the first volume published in 1817. The Law Library and GPO began this multi-year digitization effort two years ago.

This first public release contains selected volumes from the 69th Congress (1925–1927), which the public can access at: https://loc.gov/collections/united-states-congressional-serial-set/about-this-collection/. GPO is also uploading volumes of the Serial Set in phases for free public access on govinfo.gov.

There are approximately 15,735 volumes and 12 million pages in the collection.

[Clip]

Some notable information available in this release includes:

  • The Teapot Dome scandal
  • Aviation regulations
  • Smithsonian Institution reports and
  • Establishment of the Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks

The remaining volumes will be released throughout the next decade. Among the volumes the public can expect to find are maps and reports of explorations from the West; a resolution to pass the 14th Amendment to the Constitution; the transfer of Alaska to the United States in 1867 and annual reports of the Boy Scouts of America, dating back to 1924.

Learn More, Read the Complete Announcement

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

Share