March 28, 2020

Journal Article: Peer Review of Research Data Submissions to ScholarsArchive@OSU: How Can We Improve The Curation of Research Datasets to Enhance Reusability?

The article linked to below was recently published by the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

Title

Peer Review of Research Data Submissions to ScholarsArchive@OSU: How Can We Improve the Curation of Research Datasets to Enhance Reusability?

Authors

Clara Llebota
Oregon State University

Steven Van Tuyl
Academic Data Science Alliance

Source

Journal of eScience Librarianship
Volume 8, Issue 2 (2019)
DOI: 10.7191/jeslib.2019.1166

Abstract

Objectivea

Best practices such as the FAIR Principles (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, Reusability) were developed to ensure that published datasets are reusable. While we employ best practices in the curation of datasets, we want to learn how domain experts view the reusability of datasets in our institutional repository, ScholarsArchive@OSU. Curation workflows are designed by data curators based on their own recommendations, but research data is extremely specialized, and such workflows are rarely evaluated by researchers. In this project we used peer-review by domain experts to evaluate the reusability of the datasets in our institutional repository, with the goal of informing our curation methods and ensure that the limited resources of our library are maximizing the reusability of research data.

Methods
We asked all researchers who have datasets submitted in Oregon State University’s repository to refer us to domain experts who could review the reusability of their data sets. Two data curators who are non-experts also reviewed the same datasets. We gave both groups review guidelines based on the guidelines of several journals. Eleven domain experts and two data curators reviewed eight datasets. The review included the quality of the repository record, the quality of the documentation, and the quality of the data. We then compared the comments given by the two groups.

Results
Domain experts and non-expert data curators largely converged on similar scores for reviewed datasets, but the focus of critique by domain experts was somewhat divergent. A few broad issues common across reviews were: insufficient documentation, the use of links to journal articles in the place of documentation, and concerns about duplication of effort in creating documentation and metadata. Reviews also reflected the background and skills of the reviewer. Domain experts expressed a lack of expertise in data curation practices and data curators expressed their lack of expertise in the research domain.

Conclusions
The results of this investigation could help guide future research data curation activities and align domain expert and data curator expectations for reusability of datasets. We recommend further exploration of these common issues and additional domain expert peer-review project to further refine and align expectations for research data reusability.

18 pages; PDF.
 

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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