November 30, 2020

medRxiv: A New Preprint Server For the Health Sciences Announced Today by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Yale University, and BMJ

UPDATED June 25, 2019 HighWire Announces Supports For medRxiv

The [medRxiv] server, which publishes its first articles today, is hosted on HighWire’s JCore platform.

—-END UPDATE—-

From the Launch Announcement:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Yale University, and BMJ today announced the forthcoming launch of medRxiv (pronounced “med-archive”), a free online archive and distribution service for preprints in the medical and health sciences.

medRxiv is expected to begin accepting manuscripts on June 6th and will be overseen by the three organizations.

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medRxiv will accept preprints of articles covering all aspects of research in the health sciences. A manuscript’s appearance in medRxiv does not imply endorsement of its methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality by BMJ, Yale, or CSHL. There will be prominent labels on all articles that designate them as pre-peer review content.

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“medRxiv aims to do for authors engaged in clinical research what bioRxiv and arXiv have been doing for biology and physics, respectively, for many years,” said Harlan Krumholz, co-founder of medRxiv and Yale University Professor of Medicine and head of the Yale Open Data Access (YODA) Project. “Given the special requirements of preprints in medical and health fields, medRxiv will also provide new processes to help ensure that we are mitigating any risks of early dissemination while promoting the value of faster communication among the scientific community.”

Direct to Complete Launch Announcement

Direct to medRxiv

Direct to medRxiv FAQ

See Also:  “New Preprint Server For Medical Research?” (via BMJ)

Harlan Krumholz and Joseph Ross, clinician-researchers at Yale, have long been advocates of preprints, while Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory operates the bioRxiv life sciences preprint server. BMJ brings its long experience of publishing and review of clinical research, researching the effects of changes in publishing, and publication ethics.

In working to launch medRxiv we have focused on light-touch processes and workflows that we believe will reduce the potential for harm while retaining the advantages of speed and openness. A first step will be for authors to make various declarations about the work: how it has been conducted and reported, any conflicts of interest, and details of ethical approval. Then, all manuscripts will undergo several rapid rounds of screening before they are posted. The first will ensure that a manuscript is a research article (medRxiv will not accept case reports or opinion pieces, for example) and will cover obvious legal problems such as plagiarism and defamation. Then, a researcher in a relevant field will check the basic content and organisation of the article—but medRxiv does not endorse a manuscript’s methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality. And finally, a key screening question will be whether a preprint, if posted, has the potential to do harm to individual patients or the public. If in doubt medRxiv will not post the preprint; the authors will be encouraged instead to publish only after peer review.

Direct to Full Text of Editorial

See Also: Scientists Call on Funders to Make Research Freely Available Immediately, “Plan U” Proposal Published (June 4, 2019)

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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