May 24, 2019

Journal Article: “University Students’ Mobile News Consumption Activities and Evaluative/Affective Reactions to Political News During Election Campaigns: A Diary Study”

Ed. Note: Many thanks to SAGE for opening their paywall to infoDOCKET so we can share the full text article linked below at no charge. The article will be accessible for one month (beginning today) by clicking the link below.

Registration is NOT required to access the full text article.

Title

University Students’ Mobile News Consumption Activities and Evaluative/Affective Reactions to Political News During Election Campaigns: A Diary Study

Authors

Rong Tang
Simmons University

Kyong Eun Oh
Simmons University

Source

Journal of Information Science
DOI: 10.1177/0165551518819965

Abstract

Smartphones have now become routinely used tools for people’s everyday life news consumption. This article presents a diary study involving 49 university students in the United States documenting their process of consuming political news via smartphones. Participants reported the information about the news and used 23 pairs of semantic differential scales to evaluate and express their affective reactions to the news. Among 176 political news items submitted, the highest proportion was election news. Significant demographic differences were found in participants’ choices of semantic adjectives. Differences were also found in proportions of election and non-election news submitted. A higher proportion of election news was marked as ‘light’, ‘stale’, ‘shallow’, ‘worthless’, ‘dishonest’ and ‘harmful’ than those labelled for non-election news. Findings provide valuable insights into university students’ political news mobile consumption activities and their assessment and sentiment surrounding election news and general political news during the 2016 US Presidential election campaign.Article First Published Online: April 29, 2019.

Direct to Full Text Article

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

Share