June 22, 2018

Web Archiving: Webrecorder Adds New Tools and Features in Latest Release

If you’ve never taken a look at Webrecorder we encourage you to take a look and try it out.

This free web archiving tool offers many useful features, is easy to use, and has become a research tool we use regularly.

From the Rhizome Blog:

What’s New:

  • 2018-06-11_21-23-38Curated lists can guide users to the most interesting pages in a collection, and with further description and per-page annotation, provide a path through what’s been collected. Especially when lists are displayed in the new sidebar (to the left of captured websites) they can make it much easier for users to browse a collection. As has been the case with collections, users can choose to keep their lists private or share them with the world.
  • The main collection view has been redesigned to provide a cover page showcasing lists and descriptions as an easy entry point into collections.
  • Webrecorder now features a newly designed table view with filtering options, making it quicker to find a specific URL (page) in your collection.
  • Links into Webrecorder collections always contain a user-defined collection name instead of cryptic identifiers. Previously, this meant that if a collection was renamed, its URL would change and outside links would break. With this new release Webrecorder keeps track of renaming and forwards users to the correct new collection page.
  • A new visual design with subtle contrasts ensures that the web materials in collections remain the focus of presentation.

See Also: Read the Complete Blog Post

See Also: Direct to Webrecorder User Guide

See Also: OldWeb.Today: Another Web Archiving Tool from Rhizome

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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