October 26, 2021

More Developers Now Have Access to the Complete Twitter Archive

From ZDNet:

Twitter announced it’s giving developers access to the full archive of its history — all the way back to the first tweet in 2006. Until Thursday, full access to Twitter’s history was only available to enterprise API customers.

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The Full-archive Search API endpoint will give developers in its premium service 50 history requests free per month. Twitter’s program for premium APIs starts at $149 per month. The social network offers pricing for more history requests, as well.

Read the Complete Post

From an Official Twitter Blog Post

The ability to access Tweets from as early as 2006 significantly increases the types of answers and insights at your disposal. Find valuable insights, including:

What has the world been saying about my brand over the last decade?
How has the conversation during major award shows shifted over the years?
How do people respond to major technology product launches year over year?

Like the premium 30-day search endpoint, we want to give you greater access to Twitter history, and we want to make it easy to innovate and to grow your solution. Beyond the increased time frame, the new full-archive endpoint behaves exactly like the premium 30-day endpoint and includes functionality beyond what’s available in our standard search/Tweets endpoint, including:

  • more Tweets per request
  • higher rate limits
  • a counts endpoint that returns time-series counts of Tweets
  • more complex queries
  • metadata enrichments, such as expanded URLs and improved profile geo information

Read the Official Complete Twitter Blog Post

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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