November 24, 2020

Google Glass Enterprise Edition Officially Launches

From Wired:

Within three years, Alphabet (the parent company of Google and its sister company, the “moonshot factory” called X) had given up Glass for good—or so people assumed.

What they [early adopters] didn’t know was that Alphabet was commissioning a small group to develop a version for the workplace.

Announced today, it is called Glass Enterprise Edition

[Clip]

When we originally built Glass, the work we did on the technology front was very strong, and starting the Explorer program was the right thing to do to learn about how people used the product,” says Astro Teller, who runs the X division. “Where we got a little off track was trying to jump all the way to the consumer applications.” He pauses. “We got more than a little off track.”

[Clip]

Those still using the original Explorer Edition will explode with envy when they see the Enterprise Edition. For starters, it makes the technology completely accessible for those who wear prescription lenses. The camera button, which sits at the hinge of the frame, does double duty as a release switch to remove the electronics part of unit (called the Glass Pod) from the frame.

Read the Complete Article (approx. 3800 words)

See Also: Google Glass for the Enterprise FAQs and List of Glass Partners

From the FAQs:

How can I get Glass Enterprise Edition?

For now, Glass devices and software solutions are sold and supported exclusively through Glass Partners.

How much does Glass cost?

Contact a Glass Partner to talk about your business needs and get a cost estimate. The cost can vary based on the software customization, customer support and training you need.

Video Report from Endgadget

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

Share