March 5, 2021

U.S. Census Releases Statistics for More Than 40 Demographic and Economic Topics, 2015 American Community Data Now Available

Note: Data is Now Available on American FactFinder ||| Direct to Dataset: 2015 ACS (American Community Survey) 1-year Estimates

From the U.S. Census

The U.S. Census Bureau today released its most detailed look at America’s people, places and economy with new statistics on income, poverty, health insurance and more than 40 other topics from the American Community Survey.

Many states saw an increase in income and a decrease in poverty rates between 2014 and 2015. During that same period, the percentage of people covered by health insurance increased in all of the largest 25 metropolitan areas. The findings are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, the nation’s most comprehensive  information source on American households. Today’s release provides statistics on more than 40 social, economic and housing topics for U.S. communities with populations of 65,000 or more.

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Below are some of the local-level income, poverty and health insurance statistics from the American Community Survey that complement the national-level statistics released earlier this week from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey. The Current Population Survey is the leading source for national-level data, and the American Community Survey is the leading source for community and local-level data.
Poverty

  • Between 2014 and 2015, poverty rates declined in 23 states. No state saw a poverty rate increase.
  • Poverty rates in 2015 ranged from a low of 8.2 percent in New Hampshire to a high of 22.0 percent in Mississippi.
  • Some of the highest poverty rates were found in Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi and New Mexico.
  • Some of the lowest poverty rates were found in Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey and Vermont.
  • From 2014 to 2015, the poverty rate decreased in 16 of the 25 most populous metropolitan areas. None of the 25 most populous metropolitan areas saw an increase in the poverty rate.

Income

  • Real median household income increased in 39 states and the District of Columbia, with increases ranging from 1.8 percent (Connecticut) to 6.8 percent (Montana). No state saw a decrease in median household income between 2014 and 2015. (“Real” refers to income after adjusting for inflation.)
  • Maryland ($75,847) and the District of Columbia ($75,628) had median household incomes that were among the highest for 2015. They were not statistically different from each other. Mississippi ($40,593) had the lowest, which was statistically unchanged from 2014. Median household income increased in 21 of the 25 most populous metropolitan areas between 2014 and 2015. None of the 25 most populous metropolitan areas showed a decrease.
  • Median household income was lower than the U.S. median in 26 states and higher than the U.S. median in 18 states and the District of Columbia.

Income Equality

  • The Gini index is a standard economic measure of income inequality. A score of 0.0 is perfect equality in income distribution. A score of 1.0 indicates total inequality where one household has all of the income.
  • Five states and the District of Columbia had Gini indices higher than the U.S. rate: California, Connecticut, Florida, Louisiana and New York. Twelve were not statistically different from the U.S. rate; the remaining 33 were lower.
  • Most states experienced no statistical change in income inequality. Income inequality increased in eight states (Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada and New Jersey) and decreased in one (Connecticut).

Health Insurance

  • In 2015, the health insurance coverage rate for the population living inside metropolitan areas was 90.7 percent, which is 2.3 percentage points higher than the rate in 2014.
  • In 2015, the Boston metropolitan area had the highest health insurance coverage rate (97.0 percent) among the most populous 25 metropolitan areas, and the Houston metropolitan area had the lowest rate (82.7 percent).
  • Between 2014 and 2015, the percentage of people covered by health insurance increased in all 25 of the most populous 25 metropolitan areas. The change in the rate of coverage ranged from 0.8 percentage points to 5.2 percentage points.
  • Between 2013 and 2015, Miami, Los Angeles and Riverside metropolitan areas experienced the largest increase in the rate of health insurance coverage among the most populous metropolitan areas. Their rates of health insurance coverage increased by about 9.0 percentage points.

Additional Topics and Findings Released Today From the American Community Survey:

Living Arrangements of Adults

Based on data user requests, a new data table (B09021) provides statistics on the living arrangements of adults in the United States. Several findings are highlighted below:

  • Nationally in 2015, 34.1 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds in households lived in their parents’ home.
  • At the state level, New Jersey had the highest percentage of 18- to 34-year-olds in households living in their parents’ home (46.9 percent). Connecticut (41.6 percent) and New York (40.6 percent), which did not differ statistically from each other, had the next highest percentages.
  • North Dakota had the lowest percentage of 18- to 34-year-olds in households living in their parents’ home (14.1 percent) followed by the District of Columbia  (16.6 percent).

New: Citizen Voting-Age Population Statistics Added to Data Profile Table

Based on data user requests, estimates of the citizen, voting-age population, available in Detailed Table (B05003), are now included in the Data Profile table on Demographic and Housing Statistics (DP05).

Additional Annual Releases:

See Also: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2015 (September 13, 2016)

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About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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