October 17, 2021

Open Textbook Publisher OpenStax Ranks the Colleges Saving the Most With Free Textbooks

From Rice University:

Rice University-based publisher OpenStax announced Aug. 1 the top 10 schools that have saved their students the most money through adoption of OpenStax free college textbooks in the 2015-16 academic school year.

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OpenStax textbooks have saved college students more than $68 million since 2012 and $42 million in the 2015-16 school year alone. OpenStax uses philanthropic grants to produce high-quality, peer-reviewed textbooks that are free online and low-cost in print.

It launched with the goal of publishing free textbooks for the nation’s 25 most-attended college courses and is on track to meet its goal of saving students $500 million by 2020.

The schools and school systems that have saved the most money for students with OpenStax free textbooks are:

No. 1
University System of Georgia
$3,542,802
35,942 students

No. 2
California State University System
$2,134,533
21,655 students

No. 3
Florida College System
$1,940,744
19,689 students

No. 4
University of Texas System
$1,524,483
15,466 students

No. 5
University System of Ohio
$1,063,077
10,785 students

No. 6
BC campus (British Columbia, Canada)
$1,009,553
10,242 students

No. 7
Illinois Community College Board
$845,139
8,574 students

No. 8
Virginia Community College System
$833,015
8,451 students

No. 9
Tarrant County College District (Fort Worth, Texas)
$825,326
8,373 students

No. 10
University System of Maryland
$760,763
7,718 students

To date, OpenStax textbooks have been adopted by 2,026 college systems/schools and used by 686,300 students.

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About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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