September 20, 2021

Conference Paper: Open Data in Scientific Settings: From Policy to Practice

The following paper was recently presented (May 7, 2016) and published in the Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. The version below was made available by one of the co-authors.

Title

Open Data in Scientific Settings: From Policy to Practice

Authors

Irene V. Pasquetto
UCLA

Ashley E. Sands
UCLA

Peter T. Darch
University of Illinoi
UCLA

Christine L. Borgman
UCLA

Source
Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems via Selected Works of Christine L. Borgman (bepress)

Abstract

Open access to data is commonly required by funding agencies, journals, and public policy, despite the lack of agreement on the concept of “open data.” We present findings from two longitudinal case studies of major scientific collaborations, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in astronomy and the Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations in deep subseafloor biosphere studies. These sites offer comparisons in rationales and policy interpretations of open data, which are shaped by their differing scientific objectives. While policy rationales and implementations shape infrastructures for scientific data, these rationales also are shaped by pre-existing infrastructure. Meanings of the term “open data” are contingent on project objectives and on the infrastructures to which they have access.

Direct to Full Text Paper (13 pages; PDF)

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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