November 28, 2020

Arizona State University’s Noble Science and Engineering Library Closed After Flooding on Tempe Campus

Note: As we post this item 3:30 EST/1:30 MST  a message at the top of the the Arizona State U. Libraries home page and also on the the Noble Library reads “Noble Library is closed until further notice due to flooding.”

From The Republic/AZCentral.com:

Arizona State University closed one of its libraries at the Tempe campus on Friday morning due to flooding, according to an ASU campus advisory release.

Noble Library, located on East Tyler street in Tempe, will be closed and ASU advised students to stay clear of the area until further notice, according to the release.

Direct to Full Text Article and Video

From the AP:

University administrator Bruce Jensen says the Daniel E. Noble Science and Engineering Library’s sprinkler system activated at about 5 a.m. Friday and remained on for about an hour.

Jensen says damage is concentrated in the three-story building’s atrium but that other areas also are affected.

However, Jensen says it appears that most of the damage is at floor level so there’s minimal damage to the library’s collection.

Direct to Noble Library Web Site

From the Site:

The Noble Science and Engineering Library, located on Tyler Mall on the Tempe campus, houses the collections for astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geography, geology, industry standards, maps, mathematics, medicine and physics. These collections include approximately 425,000 volumes, 1200 print and several thousand electronic journal subscriptions, 210,000 sheet maps, and 20,500 aerial photographs. Additionally, the library has a tutoring center as well as open and enclosed study spaces for both individuals and groups.

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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