October 27, 2021

Legal Research: American Bar Association Launches Online Database Of Collateral Consequences for Each U.S. Jurisdiction

From the ABA:

The American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section has completed the National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction, an online database that identifies legal restrictions imposed upon individuals convicted of crimes that go beyond any sentence imposed by a court.

Available at www.abacollateralconsequences.org, the database lists federal and state laws and regulations that restrict employment, housing, and education benefits and other opportunities for people with convictions.

“While some collateral consequences of conviction serve meaningful public safety goals, many only limit a formerly incarcerated person’s ability to find work and reintegrate into society. This, in turn, imposes high social and economic costs including increased crime, increased victimization, increased family distress, and increased pressure on already-strained state and municipal budgets,” ABA President William C. Hubbard said.

Developed with a grant from the National Institute of Justice as a provision of the Court Security Improvement Act, the database collects and analyzes the collateral consequences for each U.S. jurisdiction. The database can be used to help attorneys provide more informed counsel to clients. It also provides lawmakers, advocacy groups and the public with accurate information about the scope of collateral consequences.

Direct to National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction Database

See Also: infoDOCKET First Posted About this Database When It Launched With Data For Eight States on September 21, 2012

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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