November 26, 2020

Internet Access: Wireless Broadband Penetration Grows to 68.4% in OECD Area & Other Broadband Statistics

From the OECD:

Wireless broadband penetration has grown to 68.4% in the OECD area, according to June 2013 data, meaning there are now more than two wireless subscriptions for every three inhabitants.

Source: OECD

Wireless broadband subscriptions in the 34-country group were up 16.63% from a year earlier to a total of 851 million, driven by continuing strong demand for smartphones and tablets.

Six countries (Australia, Denmark, Finland, Korea, Japan and Sweden) now lie above the 100% penetration threshold and Australia has edged into first place after a 13% surge in smartphone subscriptions in the first half of 2013.

Fixed wired broadband subscriptions in the OECD area reached 332 million as of June 2013, making an average penetration of 26.7%. Switzerland, the Netherlands and Denmark remained at the top of the table with 43.8%, 40.0% and 39.7% respectively.

DSL is still the prevalent technology, making up 52.69% of fixed broadband subscriptions, but it continues to be gradually replaced by fibre, now at 15.75% of subscriptions. Cable (30.91%) accounted for most of the remaining subscriptions.

Two-digit annual growth in fibre was sustained thanks to increases in large OECD economies with low penetration levels such as France (32% in 6 months), Spain (34%), Turkey (33%) and the United Kingdom (47%). Japan and Korea remain the OECD leaders, with fibre making up 68.45% and 62.76% of fixed broadband connections.

Access All Newly Updated (June 2013) Statistics via OECD Broadband Portal

Note: The Broaband Portal Includes a Collection of Broadband Maps For OECD Countries
First launched in October 2013.

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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