December 1, 2020

New Research Article: “Scholarometer: A Social Framework for Analyzing Impact across Disciplines”

Title

Scholarometer: A Social Framework for Analyzing Impact across Disciplines

Authors

Jasleen Kaur
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington

Diep Thi Hoang
University of Engineering and Technology, Vietnam National University
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington

Lino Possamai
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington
University of Padua, Padua, Italy

Xiaoling Sun
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington
Department of Computer Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, China

Mohsen Jafari Asbagh
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington

Snehal Patil
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington

Filippo Menczer
Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, School of Informatics & Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington

Source

PLOS One

Abstract

The use of quantitative metrics to gauge the impact of scholarly publications, authors, and disciplines is predicated on the availability of reliable usage and annotation data. Citation and download counts are widely available from digital libraries. However, current annotation systems rely on proprietary labels, refer to journals but not articles or authors, and are manually curated. To address these limitations, we propose a social framework based on crowdsourced annotations of scholars, designed to keep up with the rapidly evolving disciplinary and interdisciplinary landscape. We describe a system called Scholarometer, which provides a service to scholars by computing citation-based impact measures. This creates an incentive for users to provide disciplinary annotations of authors, which in turn can be used to compute disciplinary metrics. We first present the system architecture and several heuristics to deal with noisy bibliographic and annotation data. We report on data sharing and interactive visualization services enabled by Scholarometer. Usage statistics, illustrating the data collected and shared through the framework, suggest that the proposed crowdsourcing approach can be successful. Secondly, we illustrate how the disciplinary bibliometric indicators elicited by Scholarometer allow us to implement for the first time a universal impact measure proposed in the literature. Our evaluation suggests that this metric provides an effective means for comparing scholarly impact across disciplinary boundaries.

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About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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