December 14, 2017

Research Article: “Trust Versus Perceived Quality in Scholarly Publishing: A Personality-Attitude Intention Approach” (Preprint)

The following preprint has been made available by College & Research Libraries.

Title

Trust Versus Perceived Quality in Scholarly Publishing: A Personality-Attitude Intention Approach (Preprint)

Authors

Lars Moksness
The Arctic University of Norway

Svein Ottar Olsen
The Arctic University of Norway

Source

College & Research Libraries (C&RL)

Abstract

Digital academic journals serve as the main dissemination method for peer-reviewed research articles. These journals can be divided into two main categories: open access (OA) and non–open access (non-OA) journals. OA literature is defined by Suber as “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.”1 The reasons why no-cost OA adoption is slow-going are still largely unexplored, both theoretically and empirically. However, some influential reasons are suggested in the literature: uncertainty or distrust and perceived lower quality or reputation.2 Distrust can be caused by general skepticism towards new publication technologies and journals, article processing charges (APC), predatory publishers, and low impact factor.3 Distrust aside, findings by Björk and Salomon indicate that OA literature is approaching the same quality or academic impact as non-OA literature, in addition to maintaining a citation advantage.4 To our knowledge, no previous research has tested how researchers’ trust and perceived quality interact to influence both OA and non-OA publishing in one integrated study.

Direct to Full Text Article

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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