December 13, 2017

Smithsonian Debuts First Ebook For Students (Free): “The Mind Behind the Mask: 3-D Technology And The Portrayal Of Abraham Lincoln”

From the SI/National Museum of American History:

As part of its marking of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the assassination of the nation’s 16th president, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has published and posted its first e-book for students.The Mind behind the Mask: 3-D Technology and the Portrayal of Abraham Lincoln invites students to immerse themselves in an investigation of Abraham Lincoln, how he has been portrayed and what the availability of 3-D data can bring to the study of history.

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Inspired by the Smithsonian’s 3-D digitization of the 1860 and 1865 Lincoln life masks held at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, the National Museum of American History collaborated with the Portrait Gallery and ARTLAB+ at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden to develop the first education resource that features Smithsonian X 3D.

The e-book challenges students in grades eight to 12 to deepen their understanding of Lincoln with interactive primary sources. Using this knowledge and video-based technology instruction, students grapple with the e-book’s compelling question: How should Abraham Lincoln be portrayed? The book also allows readers to create their own portrayals using 3-D technology.

The e-book was funded through the Smithsonian’s Youth Access Grants program and by the Verizon Foundation.

Read the Complete Announcement

Direct to Full Text eBook: The Mind behind the Mask: 3-D Technology and the Portrayal of Abraham Lincoln

 

 

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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