December 16, 2017

EDUCAUSE Publishes “Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2014″

This report was released yesterday by the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR).

Selected Findings From the Report:

For the 2014 student technology use study, ECAR also collaborated with 213 institutions to collect responses from 75,306 undergraduate students about their technology experiences.

  • Technology is embedded into students’ lives, and students are generally inclined to use and to have favorable attitudes toward technology. However, technology has only a moderate influence on students’ active involvement in particular courses or as a connector with other students and faculty.
  • Students’ academic use of technology is widespread but not deep. They are particularly interested in expanding the use of a few specific technologies.
  • Many students use mobile devices for academic purposes. Their in-class use is more likely when instructors encourage such use; however, both faculty and students are concerned about their potential for distraction.
  • More students than ever have experienced a digital learning environment. The majority say they learn best with a blend of online and face-to-face work
  • Most students support institutional use of their data to advise them on academic progress in courses and programs. Many of the analytic functions students seek already exist in contemporary LMSs.

Direct to Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2014 (50 pages; PDF)

See Also: Direct to 2013 and 2012 Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology Reports

Infographic With Highlights From 2014 Report

Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology by LJ’s infoDOCKET

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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