December 14, 2017

Free Resource Alert: EBSCO Launches the Database American Doctoral Dissertations 1933-1955

From EBSCO:

The print index, Doctoral Dissertations Accepted by American Universities (DDAAU), is now available digitally as American Doctoral Dissertations 1933-1955. EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) and the Congregational Library & Archives in Boston worked together to digitize the content and build the free database from the volumes originally published by the H.W. Wilson Company. This effort was made possible through a donation from the H.W. Wilson Foundation.

American Doctoral Dissertations 1933-1955 includes nearly 100,000 dissertations from 1933 through 1955. This print index was compiled annually by the H.W. Wilson Company for the National Research Council and The American Council of Learned Societies by the Association of Research Libraries. The content in American Doctoral Dissertations 1933-1955 represents the only comprehensive record of dissertations accepted by U.S. universities during that period of time.

EBSCO has made the database freely available to researchers on the open Web worldwide at http://www.OpenDissertations.com. The database is searchable by fields that include dissertation title, author and school.

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EBSCO Senior Vice President of Business Development, Mark Herrick says by digitizing the database and making it available for free, EBSCO is providing a new way to access scholarly writing for a vital time period in American history. “American Doctoral Dissertations 1933-1955 pulls together dissertations in a single freely database, making it simple for people to find this previously hidden valuable content.”

Read the Complete News Release

Direct To OpenDissertations.com

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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