October 6, 2015

New Research Article: “Issues in Teen Technology Use to Find Health Information”

The following full text article was published online by the The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults from the Young Adult Library Services Association (a division of ALA).


Issues in Teen Technology Use to Find Health Information


Lesley Farmer, Ed.D.
California State University Long Beach


The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults
Vol. 4 (2014)


Teens need and want information about health issues. Even though teens tend to prefer asking people for help, increasingly they access digital resources because of the Internet’s availability, affordability, and anonymity. This paper presents a critical literature review of studies of teens’ online health information-seeking and discusses several issues related to teen technology use for seeking health information. The results indicate that teen health information interests vary by age, gender, social situation, and motivation. Several issues about how teens access and seek that information are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations to insure optimal library services to address the health information needs of all teens.

Direct to Full Text Article

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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