December 18, 2014

Video: An Introduction to the “Digitize this Book” Service From Duke University Libraries

share save 171 16 Video: An Introduction to the Digitize this Book Service From Duke University Libraries

Back in February we posted about the introduction of the Digitize this Book service that Duke U. Libraries had just began to offer Duke students, faculty, and staff.

In a Nutshell:

Starting this semester, Duke University faculty, students, and staff can request to have certain public domain books scanned on demand. If a book is published before 1923* and located in the Perkins, Bostock, Lilly, or Music Library or in the Library Service Center (LSC), a green “Digitize This Book” button will appear in its online catalog record. Clicking on this button starts the request.

Within two weeks (although likely sooner), you will get an email with a link to the digitized book in the Duke University Libraries collections on the Internet Archive. You—and the rest of the world—can now read this book online, download it to your Kindle, export it as a PDF, or get it as a fully searchable text-only file. And you never have to worry about late fees or recalls!

Of course, it’s one thing to introduce a new service and another thing to get people to know about the service and make use of it.

Here’s a new “Digitize this Book” overview/promo video with Liz Milewicz, Head of Digital Scholarship Services at Duke U. Libraries.

Note: This scanning service is only available to Duke U. faculty, students, and staff.

Direct to: “Duke University Libraries Debuts Book Scanning Service for Faculty, Students, Staff” (February 22, 2013)

share save 171 16 Video: An Introduction to the Digitize this Book Service From Duke University Libraries
Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.