October 6, 2015

A Missouri Public Library Agrees Not to Block Witch Websites

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

A Missouri library has agreed not to censor patrons’ internet searches on the Wiccan faith, Native American religions and other spiritual matters, the ACLU said Wednesday.

In the consent judgment, approved Tuesday, the Salem, Mo., Public Library’s board agreed not to re-impose filters that blocked the category “occult,” among others. Salem is in Dent County about 100 miles southwest of St. Louis.


[Salem resident Anaka] Hunter’s suit also claimed that library director Glenda Wofford refused to unblock all but one page of the sites Hunter wanted to view, and Wofford said “that she had an ‘obligation’ to call the ‘proper authorities’ to report those who were attempting to access blocked sites if she thought they would misuse the information they were attempting to access.”

Hunter’s concerns were then “brushed off” by the board, the ACLU says.

Read the Complete Article

Here’s the Full Text of the ACLU Statement Referred to in the Article

Full Text of the Consent Decree,  Filed In U.S. District Court, Eastern Dist. of Missouri

Full Text of the Consent Decree in Hunter v. Board of Trustees, Salem Public Library

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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