November 25, 2015

Online Database: “Searching For Public Art”

The Art Works Blog (from the National Endowment for the Arts Blog) offers a brief intro to the Public Art Archive database and talks with with Rachel J. Cain, the program manager of the Public Art Archive, and Anthony Radich, the executive director of WESTAF.

From the Blog Post:

There is a new tool to help you find public art— the Public Art Archive, a data-rich, online catalogue of public art throughout the U.S. and Canada put together by the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF). WESTAF is a regional arts service organization dedicated to the creative development and preservation of the arts, with an emphasis on technology. While the organization primarily serves the 13 states that make up its membership, WESTAF impacts the entire country through their new technology tools designed for the creative industries.


The archive also boasts a mobile site that grants visitors easy access to the database, including a geo-location feature to immediately find artworks near you. With 100 collections catalogued to date, WESTAF continues to accept content submissions to the archive.

Read the Complete Blog Post

Direct to Public Art Archive Database

Learn More About Public Art Archive Database Features

Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price ( is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.

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