April 24, 2014

New Research Paper: The Role of Gender in Scholarly Authorship

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Title

The Role of Gender in Scholarly Authorship

Authors

Jevin D. West
University of Washington

Jennifer Jacquet
New York University

Molly M. King
Stanford University

Shelley J. Correll
Santa Fe Institute

Carl T. Bergstrom
University of Washington
Santa Fe Institute

Source

via arXiv

Abstract

Gender disparities appear to be decreasing in academia according to a number of metrics, such as grant funding, hiring, acceptance at scholarly journals, and productivity, and it might be tempting to think that gender inequity will soon be a problem of the past. However, a large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain. For instance, even where raw publication counts seem to be equal between genders, close inspection reveals that, in certain fields, men predominate in the prestigious first and last author positions. Moreover, women are significantly underrepresented as authors of single-authored papers. Academics should be aware of the subtle ways that gender disparities can appear in scholarly authorship.

Direct to Full Text (6 pages; PDF)

share save 171 16 New Research Paper: The Role of Gender in Scholarly Authorship
Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.