July 31, 2014

Standards: NISO Publishes Revised Recommended Practice for RFID in U.S. Libraries

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From the National Information Standards Organization:

The National Information Standards Organization announces the availability of RFID in U.S. Libraries (NISO RP-6-2012), a revision of the 2008 Recommended Practice that provides a set of practices and procedures to ensure interoperability among U.S. RFID implementations in libraries. By following these recommendations, libraries can ensure that an RFID tag in one library can be used seamlessly by another, assuming both comply, even if they have different suppliers for tags, hardware, and software.

Since the publication of the original Recommended Practice, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) published in 2011 a three-part international standard on RFID in Libraries (ISO 28560) defining the data model and the encoding of data on RFID tags for item management in libraries. The revised NISO Recommended Practice has been updated to reflect changes in technology and security and privacy measures, and to serve as a U.S. profile for the ISO standard.

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“This revision included input from RFID hardware manufacturers, solution providers, content distributors, and libraries,” said Todd Carpenter, NISO Managing Director. “Libraries that have been holding back on implementation now have the standard approach they need to protect their investments in RFID.”

Read the Complete News Release

Direct to Revised, RFID in U.S. Libraries (NISO RP-6-2012)

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Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.