August 30, 2014

Video: Business Insider: "Here's What Normal People Really Think Of Google+"

share save 171 16 Video: Business Insider: "Here's What Normal People Really Think Of Google+"

Direct to Video: “Here’s What Normal People Really Think Of Google (via Business Insider)

We’ve said it many times and we will say it again, although Google+ has been successful (very successful) to this point with early adopters and tech geeks, it in no way reflects what the non-geek user (aka “the masses”) think or know about the service.

1. Yes, the service is still a “field test” but Google+ has received a steady amount of mainstream press attention.

2. “Person on the street” interviews like the ones in the video are random and unscientific.

Nevertheless, it’s getting easier and easier for anyone who wants one to get a Google+ invite and those who’ve been using G+ are now offering invites to others.

So, for no other reason than as a reminder that not everyone has a strong, if any, interest in Google+ but still uses social media, we’re passing along this video.

Additionally, for many people to move to another network (we’re not sure the masses want to use more than one network) their family, colleagues, and other friends (the people they socialize with) will also need to move from Facebook (most likely) to G+.

One more thing. People from 13-18 years old, who might want to try something new, are not welcome on G+ at this time. It will be interesting to watch to see if Google changes their policy moving forward.

Direct to Video: “Here’s What Normal People Really Think Of Google (via Business Insider)

share save 171 16 Video: Business Insider: "Here's What Normal People Really Think Of Google+"
Gary Price About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.